EarthQuaker Devices Starts With The Afterneath Reverb Module In The Eurorack Adventure

EarthQuaker Devices is now doing Eurorack and turning the Afterneath pedal into a reverberator module.

This news is no surprise and even a logical step. EarthQuaker Devices, a well-known manufacturer for excellent guitar pedals, ventures into the Eurorack world. Some pedal developers (Eventide, SnazzyFX, 4ms…) have already made this decision. The first effect module of the US-based company is a port of the Afterneath reverberator pedal to the Eurorack format. A reverb effect processor that can create unique oscillating atmospheric washes, warped echos and more.

Comparing the EarthQuaker Devices Afterneath Eurorack module with the pedal, there are some similarities but also major changes. First, the length, diffuse, dampen, drag, reflect and mix knobs are equal to the stompbox version. New on the Eurorack version is an input & mode knob, and of course CV control over the main sound design functions: drag, mode, diffuse and length.

EarthQuaker Devices Afterneath Eurorack

Mono No Stereo Operation

Like the pedal version, the Afterneath Eurorack module can only be operated in mono (input/output) but has inputs for reflect send/return. True stereo is not possible but the module is capable of pseudo-stereo operation by patching out of the Reflect Send and Output simultaneously.

Preliminary Feature List

After the article went online, Josh from EarthQuaker devices contacted me and told me the preliminary list of features. The Afterneath module is 16hp and draws 95 mA from only the positive rail.

  • Input: Adjusts the level of the incoming signal to allow for signals ranging from instrument-level (Clockwise) to modular-level (counterclockwise).
  • Dampen: Controls the tone of the wet signal. Clockwise for brighter tones, counterclockwise for darker tones.
  • Reflect: Controls the regeneration of the reverb, turn clockwise for more wash and echoes, counterclockwise for less. This will self-oscillate if turned up high. Acts as an attenuator when there is a signal patched into the “Reflect Return” jack.
  • Mix: Controls the amount of wet signal that is mixed with the dry signal. Though it does not actually go completely wet, you can achieve a fully wet signal by engaging the “Dry Kill” switch.
  • Dry Kill: Eliminates the dry signal from the output, leaving only the wet signal.
  • Drag: This digital reverb is made up of a bunch of short delays, “Drag” separates the delay lines creating a stuttering, pingy effect. This is the coolest control on the Afterneath; we highly advise slowly turning (or modulating) this while you let notes ring out for a cool warped speed effect. The effect is more delay-like as you turn it counter-clockwise, and it is more reverb-like as you turn it clockwise. You will achieve shorter delay times as you move the control clockwise, and longer delay times when you turn the control counterclockwise. You will notice a change in pitch when adjusting this control with sound present in the effects buffer, or when the effect is self-oscillating.

Mode: Controls the behavior of the “Drag” control as well as how it responds to control voltage. There are 8 different modes:

  • Linear – smooth, un-quantized response over the operating range
  • Linear with Slew – Smooth, un-quantized response over the entire operating range, but with a musical slew that is reminiscent of turning the vari-speed knob on a vintage British tape delay. The “Drag” will lag behind the knob or cv changes, but then quickly catch up
  • Linear Volt/Octave – Smooth and un-quantized, yet scaled to align with the 1V/octave curve to allow melodic modulation of audio in the buffer, or control the frequency of self-oscillation like a voltage controlled oscillator
  • Chromatic Scale – Quantized 1V/octave to the chromatic scale
  • Major Scale – Quantized 1V/octave to the major scale
  • Minor Scale – Quantized 1V/octave to the minor scale
  • Pentatonic Scale – Quantized 1V/octave to the pentatonic scale
  • Octaves and Fifths – Quantized 1V/octave to omit all but octaves and fifths
  • Octaves – Quantized 1V/octave to omit all but octaves

  • Diffuse: Smooths and diffuses the delay repeats. Sharper transients with more attack counter clockwise, more ambient, reverb-like and washy as you turn it clockwise.
  • Length: Controls the decay length of the reverb.
  • Mode LED: Visually indicates the current mode.
  • 4 CV Inverting Attenuator (Drag, Mode, Diffuse, Length) attenuates or inverts the incoming CV. The CV is at unity gain when the attenuator is fully-clockwise, inverted when it is fully-counterclockwise and the CV is completely attenuated when the attenuator is in the 12 o’clock position.
  • CV inputs for Drag, Mode, Diffuse, Lenght allows modulation of the “parameter” using external CV.
  • Audio Input: Accepts audio signals ranging from instrument-level to modular-level, using the “Input” knob to adjust the level.
  • Reflect Send: Allows external patching and processing of the “Reflect” feedback path. Patching from this output does not interrupt the internal feedback path.
  • Reflect Return: Allows return of the externally patched and processed “Reflect” feedback path. Also, it can be used as an additional audio input if you wish to forego the feedback. The “Reflect” knob acts as an attenuator for the audio that is patched to this input. Please note that processing of the “Reflect” feedback path can easily result in self-oscillation when processing with effects such as distortion or a resonant filter. The Reflect knob can be used to compensate for this factor. Patching a cable to this input will disconnect the internal feedback path, but the “Reflect Send” will still be active.
  • Audio Output

First Impression

Finally, Eurorack musicians get one of the best guitar pedals as modules. The Afterneath Reverb is hopefully just the beginning of a long effect journey. We can look forward to more in the future. I think this will be a huge success for EarthQuaker Devices.

Availability & Price: TBA but they hope to release the module sometime within the next year

More information here: EarthQuaker Devices

EQD pedals are available at our partner

Thomann

Eurorack News

1 Comment

  1. Thank you so much for the nice article!

    Actually, the module is capable of pseudo-stereo operation by patching out of the “Reflect Send” and “Output” simultaneously. It sounds really good!

    The modes control how the “Drag” parameter responds to knob or cv changes. When there is a change to this parameter it changes the pitch and fidelity of the audio that is in the effects buffer.

    Here is a preliminary list of features if you would like to include them in your article:

    1. Input: Adjusts the level of the incoming signal to allow for signals ranging from instrument-level (Clockwise) to modular-level (counterclockwise).
    2. Dampen: Controls the tone of the wet signal. Clockwise for brighter tones, counter clockwise for darker tones.
    3. Reflect: Controls the regeneration of the reverb, turn clockwise for more wash and echoes, counterclockwise for less. This will self-oscillate if turned up high. Acts as an attenuator when there is a signal patched into the “Reflect Return” jack.
    4. Mix: Controls the amount of wet signal that is mixed with the dry signal. Though it does not actually go completely wet, you can achieve a fully wet signal by engaging the “Dry Kill” switch.
    5. Dry Kill: Eliminates the dry signal from the output, leaving only the wet signal.
    6. Drag: This digital reverb is made up of a bunch of short delays, “Drag” separates the delay lines creating a stuttering, pingy effect. This is the coolest control on the Afterneath; we highly advise slowly turning (or modulating) this while you let notes ring out for a cool warped speed effect. The effect is more delay-like as you turn it counter clockwise, and it is more reverb-like as you turn it clockwise. You will achieve shorter delay times as you move the control clockwise, and longer delay times when you turn the control counter clockwise. You will notice a change in pitch when adjusting this control with sound present in the effects buffer, or when the effect is self-oscillating.
    7. Mode: Controls the behavior of the “Drag” control as well as how it responds to control voltage. There are 8 different modes:
    • Linear – smooth, un-quantized response over the operating range
    • Linear with Slew – Smooth, un-quantized response over the entire operating range, but with a musical slew that is reminiscent of turning the varispeed knob on a vintage British tape delay. The “Drag” will lag behind the knob or cv changes, but then quickly catch up
    • Linear Volt/Octave – Smooth and un-quantized, yet scaled to align with the 1V/octave curve to allow melodic modulation of audio in the buffer, or control the frequency of self-oscillation like a voltage controlled oscillator
    • Chromatic Scale – Quantized 1V/octave to the chromatic scale
    • Major Scale – Quantized 1V/octave to the major scale
    • Minor Scale – Quantized 1V/octave to the minor scale
    • Pentatonic Scale – Quantized 1V/octave to the pentatonic scale
    • Octaves and Fifths – Quantized 1V/octave to omit all but octaves and fifths
    • Octaves – Quantized 1V/octave to omit all but octaves

    8. Diffuse: Smooths and diffuses the delay repeats. Sharper transients with more attack counter clockwise, more ambient, reverb-like and washy as you turn it clockwise.
    9. Length: Controls the decay length of the reverb.
    10. Mode LED: Visually indicates the current mode.
    11. Drag CV Inverting Attenuator: Attenuates or inverts the incoming CV. The CV is at unity gain when the attenuator is fully-clockwise, inverted when it is fully-counterclockwise and the CV is completely attenuated when the attenuator is in the 12 o’clock position.
    12. Mode CV Inverting Attenuator: Attenuates or inverts the incoming CV. The CV is at unity gain when the attenuator is fully-clockwise, inverted when it is fully-counterclockwise and the CV is completely attenuated when the attenuator is in the 12 o’clock position.
    13. Diffuse CV Inverting Attenuator: Attenuates or inverts the incoming CV. The CV is at unity gain when the attenuator is fully-clockwise, inverted when it is fully-counterclockwise and the CV is completely attenuated when the attenuator is in the 12 o’clock position.
    14. Length CV Inverting Attenuator: Attenuates or inverts the incoming CV. The CV is at unity gain when the attenuator is fully-clockwise, inverted when it is fully-counterclockwise and the CV is completely attenuated when the attenuator is in the 12 o’clock position.
    15. Drag CV Input: Allows modulation of the “Drag” control using external CV.
    16. Mode CV Input: Allows modulation of the “Mode” control using external CV.
    17. Diffuse CV Input: Allows modulation of the “Diffuse” control using external CV.
    18. Length CV Input: Allows modulation of the “Length” control using external CV.
    19. Audio Input: Accepts audio signals ranging from instrument-level to modular-level, using the “Input” knob to adjust the level.
    20. Reflect Send: Allows external patching and processing of the “Reflect” feedback path. Patching from this output does not interrupt the internal feedback path.
    21. Reflect Return: Allows return of the externally patched and processed “Reflect” feedback path. Also, it can be used as an additional audio input if you wish to forego the feedback. The “Reflect” knob acts as an attenuator for the audio that is patched to this input. Please note that processing of the “Reflect” feedback path can easily result in self-oscillation when processing with effects such as distortion or a resonant filter. The Reflect knob can be used to compensate for this factor. Patching a cable to this input will disconnect the internal feedback path, but the “Reflect Send” will still be active.
    22. Audio Output

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