Death of all 32 Bit IOS App with the release of IOS 11?

A bad news comes from the 9to5mac website for IOS users and musicians. Probably Apple plan to not longer support apps with 32 bit architecture in IOS 11. The problem is that many IOS apps will no longer work with the newest operation system and some important apps are death at this point. Good example will be Nanostudio, one of the first IOS music digital audio workstations. The developers wrote in their forum that they will release Nanostudio 2 with 64 Bit architecture. I hope Apple will not kill all this legendary old apps from the store but I don’t have a lot of esperance for an work change.

I recommend to all IOS developer to update the existing apps to guarantee that we can work with these apps in the future. If you want to use these apps, don’t update to IOS 11. In the latest 10.3 beta, Apple warned already the people about 32 bit apps which can slow down the iPad. Be carful.

 
Here is the communication from the Nanostudio forum:
NS1 can’t be updated because it is a 32 bit app and Apple now requires all apps to be 64 bit. It took Matt 3 years to develop NanoStudio the first time. NS was last updated at the end of Aug 2014. That’s about 2 years and 5 months, so he’s on par with his previous development time even though he’s adding in a whole crap load of new features.
Matt recently said that NS2 will be released in 2017.
http://forums.blipinteractive.co.uk/node/11581#comment-33064

1 Comment

  1. Trouble is, to achieve the data manipulation needed for real time wave generation and various modulation and filtering coders had to dip into ARM assembly language on the early iOS machines. So it's not just a matter of changing you compiler pipeline as this would have no effect of you inline/statically linked ARM assembly code. This means that yes a lot of apps will die but unfortunately it will have more of an effect on music apps than any other app type on the App Store. Apple does not need to do this, the current ARM chips have support for both 32 and 64 bit code, it's just Apples way of forcing code to 64 bit which is slightly more efficient. As usual it's Apples way or the highway. A lot of my coding buddies have dropped iOS support because of this type of stuff.

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